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Common Fertility Myths holisticher

Common Fertility Myths

When it comes to getting pregnant and infertility, there are no shortage of myths. Chances are you’ve heard a lot of them from well-meaning family and friends hoping to make you feel better. But when you’re trying to conceive, it’s important to separate fact from fiction — here we try to debunk some common fertility myths.

When it comes to getting pregnant and infertility, there are no shortage of myths. Chances are you’ve heard a lot of them from well-meaning family and friends hoping to make you feel better. But when you’re trying to conceive, it’s important to separate fact from fiction — here we try to debunk some common fertility myths.
Myth: Infertility is rare. It’s easy for most women to get pregnant.

Statistics show that 15 percent of all couples will face fertility issues, and many will be diagnosed with a reproductive disorder.

Myth: Couples should always try for at least a year before seeing their doctor

Usually, infertility is defined as one year of unprotected intercourse without conception. However, this is more of a guideline, than an actual rule. Many couples should seek medical help sooner — for example, women over age 35, those with a history of irregular periods, fibroids, endometriosis, pelvic adhesive disease, ectopic pregnancy or multiple miscarriages. Same for couples with a male history of surgery, infection or trauma to the genitals.

Myth: Women can’t get pregnant after 35

While a woman’s peak reproductive years begin in her late teens and continue into her late 20s, many women go on to have healthy pregnancies later in life. For example, about one in six couples in which the woman is 35 and older have fertility problems, which means that many women over the age 35 do not struggle fertility-wise. The decline in fertility after 35 is not nearly as dramatic as the often quoted statistics suggest.

Myth: Using birth control can cause infertility

The pill doesn’t affect fertility either positively or negatively. And a woman’s normal menstrual cycle will almost always continue within a month or two after she’s stopped taking the pill. But if things haven’t gone back to normal within three months of stopping birth control, make an appointment with your doctor.

Myth: An irregular menstrual cycle means infertility

Irregular menstrual cycles are pretty common. Sleep disruptions, exercise, stress, and other factors can change the delicate balance of the menstrual cycle. If you have concerns about irregular cycles, it’s worth speaking to your doctor sooner rather than later especially if you’ve gone more than three months without a period.

Myth: Infertility can’t happen in young men and women

Older age is often to blame — generally women over 35 and men over 50 have lower fertility rates, but young men and women can face infertility too. Nearly 1 in 10 women face infertility before reaching age 30.

Myth: Infertilty is a woman’s issue

One-third of infertility cases are caused by male reproductive issues, one-third by female reproductive issues, and one-third by both parties or by unknown factors.

Sperm disorders or other male factors can cause infertility. The issue may be the number of sperm, the shape of the sperm, the sperm’s ability to effectively move, or that some men produce little or no sperm, or have blockages that prevent sperm from being released.

The truth is that your partner's health habits are just as important when it comes to your ability to conceive as a couple. It’s essential to focus on what both you and your partner can do together to increase your chances of having a healthy child.

Myth: IVF is the only effective solution to fertility problems.

This is simply not true. Dietary and lifestyle based treatments have been proven effective in multiple studies and in thousands of clinical cases.

For couples dealing with infertility, in vitro fertilization (IVF) is rarely the first option. There are many other treatments (that are far less expensive).

Myth: Conception is easy after baby #1.

Many people experience difficulty getting pregnant after baby #1. Known as secondary infertility, this syndrome affects couples that already have one child but are unable to get pregnant or carry a pregnancy to term for the second time.

The same factors responsible for primary fertility problems are often to blame: pelvic scarring, endometriosis, blocked fallopian tubes, defective ovulation, poor sperm quantity or quality, etc. Complications during labor and delivery could have triggered a problem, or the fertility problems may be age-related if several years have passed. Treatments for primary and secondary fertility problems are the same.

Myth: Stress causes infertility. Just relax, and you’ll get pregnant!

This idea is just not accurate for those dealing with infertility. It is true that very high stress conditions can cause problems with ovulation. However, for the vast majority of couples, stress cannot be directly linked as the cause of infertility. Many experts do believe that stress-minimizing activities (such as yoga and acupuncture) are positive for the wellbeing of the patient — but they have not been proven to give a definitive fertility benefit.

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